Tag Archives: Stephen Mihm

BOOKS Recently Read by Bill Dahl at 3/24/17

Here are the books I have recently completed reading through 3/24/17. Yes, my focus is currently the history of the evolution of capitalism in U.S.  I find the degree of financial illiteracy in the U.S. in the 21st century absolutely shocking. History provides a basis from which to more deeply appreciate where, when, how and who influenced  the emergence and current state of this “Grand Experiment.”

Every book always leads me to interest in another. I am particularly grateful to author/historian Jessica Lepler, Assistant Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire (and author of a fantastic work: The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis. Also – author/historian Stephen Mihm, Associate Professor of History at the University of Georgia and author of a MUST READ: A Nation of Counterfeiters: Capitalists, Con Men, and the Making of the United States (Harvard University Press, 2007). Both these scholars shared their recommended reading lists with me on 19th century U.S. financial history.

Here’s the list of books I have read in this genre in the past few weeks:


 

The depth and breadth of research contained in this volume is difficult to comprehend. Jessica Lepler invested years in the research and writing of this fascinating treatise – on two continents. My Oh My – this book is a national historical treasure. Period. The characters she brings to life and the various escapades they venture upon – priceless. This volume occupies a distinct place of honor in my personal library

A journey into the untold economic historical mystery that 21st Century Americans are completely unaware of. Thrilling, intriguing, reality of the force of counterfeiting in the history of the U.S. – Gosh, I adored this work. Stephen Mihm is a master researcher, story teller and weaver of the sinew of an oftentimes overlooked subject in the ligaments of U.S. economic history. Honestly, this volume is SIMPLY SPECTACULAR!!!

A sociological and historical classic. The history of risk in the U.S. – insurance companies, the rise of the corporation, the Freedman’s bank, the emergence of employee benefits,  etc.- the

This book explained my never ending discomfort with Timothy Geithner as U.S. Treasury Secretary. I doubt if you will ever see Giethner and Blair breaking bread together after reading this book. The book is insightful for Blair’s inside look at her term as Chairperson of the FDIC during the Great Recession – and her incessant advocacy for the fate of the U.S. consumer and homeowners…a noble effort, throughout years of public service, too often obstructed by others. Without Blair at the helm of the FDIC during the great Recession – trust me – things would have been much worse. Yet, there remains much financial re-engineering yet to be done…as she urges her readers to passionately advocate for TODAY.

No treatment of the history of U.S. economy can overlook the emergence and establishment of railroads. A phenomenal treatise.

A CLASSIC – although focused on the evolution of international banking, the treatment of the U.S. institutions, policy and practice development are a CANNOT MISS THIS BOOK!!!


 

ENJOY!!!