Tag Archives: U.S. Financial History

The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis by Jessica M. Lepler

Superb! Period!


 

Far too many financial histories inhabit the shelves and stacks that have one thing in common: an intellectual agenda in search of support. This work is a uniquely refreshing exception. It is a work that distinctly deserves the scholarly recognition it has received – from many, diverse audiences.

Lepler Many Panics

I enjoy reading in this subject area. This particular work was delicious for me for a myriad of reasons. Here are a few:

1. Linguistics – Lepler’s appreciation for the words, terms and phrases people used to describe their life experience was precious to me. It is too often overlooked by other authors.

2. The sheer depth and breadth of Lepler’s research was, to say the least, unique and vividly rewarding for her readers.

3. Lepler’s appreciation for the impact of “culture” was quite apparent – again and again – enlightening.

4. AGAIN – Far too many authors who write financial histories seem to have a thesis that they attempt to validate via the introduction of a supporting narrative – such is the human penchant to “be right” and get at “the truth.” Lepler’s methodology and multi-dimensional approach to the issue of “many” panics was terribly refreshing.

5. It was a pleasure to read a financial history book that was authored by a bonafide historian vs. an economist or a political hack with an agenda. The author’s objective dedication to her scholarly craft was apparent on every page.

6. The author’s critiques of other works were, in my opinion, “spot on.” I was grateful for the courage to say what she wrote.

7. I adored the characters brought to life. It made the book fascinating.

8. Lepler’s appreciation for epistemology was apparent throughout.

9. The author’s contributions from the “phrenology folks” were priceless.

10. Lepler’s focus on the impact of communication (or lack thereof) between persons, media outlets of the day, groups and organizations (and governments) is a fundamentally important dimension of the author’s contribution.

As Lepler states on page 253: “Even when economic events seem beyond the control of any individual, the shaping of their meaning remains within our grasp.” – How marvelously this work remained true to this statement – in every sense of the phrase.

My edition of the “Many Panics” by Jessica M. Lepler is marked up like a child writing with crayon on a kitchen wall. This book is a treasure for me and I have learned to become a better researcher and story teller because of it. It is simply VERY rare to have the privilege to devour and digest such a magnificent work. I sincerely hope that Lepler’s dedication to a tireless methodological approach for source documents will serve to inspire other historians and writers – and students – as this work inspired me. This work will occupy a prominent position in my personal library. I will refer to it quite often.

I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS WORK!!!


 

BOOKS Recently Read by Bill Dahl at 3/24/17

Here are the books I have recently completed reading through 3/24/17. Yes, my focus is currently the history of the evolution of capitalism in U.S.  I find the degree of financial illiteracy in the U.S. in the 21st century absolutely shocking. History provides a basis from which to more deeply appreciate where, when, how and who influenced  the emergence and current state of this “Grand Experiment.”

Every book always leads me to interest in another. I am particularly grateful to author/historian Jessica Lepler, Assistant Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire (and author of a fantastic work: The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis. Also – author/historian Stephen Mihm, Associate Professor of History at the University of Georgia and author of a MUST READ: A Nation of Counterfeiters: Capitalists, Con Men, and the Making of the United States (Harvard University Press, 2007). Both these scholars shared their recommended reading lists with me on 19th century U.S. financial history.

Here’s the list of books I have read in this genre in the past few weeks:


 

The depth and breadth of research contained in this volume is difficult to comprehend. Jessica Lepler invested years in the research and writing of this fascinating treatise – on two continents. My Oh My – this book is a national historical treasure. Period. The characters she brings to life and the various escapades they venture upon – priceless. This volume occupies a distinct place of honor in my personal library

A journey into the untold economic historical mystery that 21st Century Americans are completely unaware of. Thrilling, intriguing, reality of the force of counterfeiting in the history of the U.S. – Gosh, I adored this work. Stephen Mihm is a master researcher, story teller and weaver of the sinew of an oftentimes overlooked subject in the ligaments of U.S. economic history. Honestly, this volume is SIMPLY SPECTACULAR!!!

A sociological and historical classic. The history of risk in the U.S. – insurance companies, the rise of the corporation, the Freedman’s bank, the emergence of employee benefits,  etc.- the

This book explained my never ending discomfort with Timothy Geithner as U.S. Treasury Secretary. I doubt if you will ever see Giethner and Blair breaking bread together after reading this book. The book is insightful for Blair’s inside look at her term as Chairperson of the FDIC during the Great Recession – and her incessant advocacy for the fate of the U.S. consumer and homeowners…a noble effort, throughout years of public service, too often obstructed by others. Without Blair at the helm of the FDIC during the great Recession – trust me – things would have been much worse. Yet, there remains much financial re-engineering yet to be done…as she urges her readers to passionately advocate for TODAY.

No treatment of the history of U.S. economy can overlook the emergence and establishment of railroads. A phenomenal treatise.

A CLASSIC – although focused on the evolution of international banking, the treatment of the U.S. institutions, policy and practice development are a CANNOT MISS THIS BOOK!!!


 

ENJOY!!!